SJD student Daniel Del Gobbo co-authors article in Policy Options on modernizing the criminal justice system in the wake of #MeToo

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

SJD student and Trudeau Scholar Daniel Del Gobbo has co-authored (with Vathsala Illesinghe) a commentary in the magazine Policy Options, "The #MeToo movement has exposed inequalities in the legal system that disadvantage women. Restorative justice could help in certain sexual violence cases" (April 23, 2018).

Read the full commentary on the Policy Options website, or below.

Constitutional Criminal Law Workshop

The Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, together with the Normative Orders Cluster of Excellence at Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main and the Nathanson Centre for Transnational Human Rights, Crime and Security are hosting a workshop on Constitutional Criminal Law on 14-15 September, 2018.

Participation in this workshop is by invitation only.

Prof. Kent Roach writes "Why the Quebec City mosque shooting was terrorism"

Friday, April 20, 2018

In a commentary in the Globe and Mail, Prof. Kent Roach argues that Alexandre Bissonnette could and should have been charged with terrorism as well as murder, on the basis of s.231(6.01) of the Criminal Code ("Why the Quebec City mosque shooting was terrorism," April 20, 2018).

Read the full commentary on the Globe and Mail website, or below.

Criminal Law and Civil Peace Workshop

The University of Toronto Law Journal is hosting a workshop on Criminal Law and Civil Peace at the Faculty of Law on 17-18 May 2018.

Prof. Kent Roach writes "Ending peremptory challenges in jury selection is a good first step" in Ottawa Citizen

Monday, April 2, 2018

In a commentary in the Ottawa Citizen, Prof. Kent Roach argues that the federal government's proposal in Bill C-75 to eliminate peremptory challenges in jury selection is an important first step towards ensuring representative juries ("Ending peremptory challenges in jury selection is a good first step," April 2, 2018).

Read the full commentary on the Ottawa Citizen website, or below.

Prof. Kent Roach on how the Canadian legal system fails Indigenous people like Colten Boushie

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Photo of Colten Boushie
Colten Boushie in a photo posted Nov. 6, 2011 (photo via Facebook)

By Geoffrey Vendeville

The verdict in the Colten Boushie case has provoked outrage across the country and prompted reflection about how the justice system treats Indigenous people. 

Prof. Kent Roach writes "Colten Boushie’s family should be upset: Our jury selection procedure is not fair"

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

In a commentary in the Globe and Mail, Prof. Kent Roach argues that the ability of both the prosecution and the defence to exercise peremptory challenges of prospective jurors means the current method of jury selection in Canadian trials  is fundamentally unfair and makes it possible for lawyers to discriminate against Indigenous persons and others ("Colten Boushie’s family should be upset: Our jury selection procedure is not fair," January 20, 2018).

Indigenous Initiatives' Amanda Carling and Prof. Kent Roach co-authors of "Mandatory minimum sentencing should be Trudeau’s first resolution"

Wednesday, January 3, 2018

Amanda Carling, Manager of Indigenous Initiatives, and Prof. Kent Roach are among the co-authors of a commentary in the Globe and Mail calling on the federal government to amend the criminal code to allow judges to depart from mandatory minimum sentences if they give specific reasons for doing so, as recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission ("Mandatory minimum sentencing should be Trudeau’s first resolution," January 2, 2018).

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