Kashmir Human Rights Crisis: A Teach-In

Kashmir Human Rights Crisis: A Teach-In
November 4, 2019, 6-8 pm
Moot Court Room, J250
Jackman Law Building, 78 Queens Park Crescent

Prof. Trudo Lemmens co-authors "The latest medical assistance in dying decision needs to be appealed: Here’s why"

Thursday, October 10, 2019

In a commentary in The Conversation, Prof. Trudo Lemmens and co-author Laverne Jacobs  (University of Windsor , Faculty of Law) argue that what’s known as the Truchon decision, which invalidated Canada’s “reasonable foreseeable death” and “end of life” access criteria for medical assistance in dying, should be appealed ("The latest medical assistance in dying decision needs to be appealed: Here’s why," October 9, 2019).

Prof. Kent Roach writes "The fight against far-right terrorism is complex, arduous – and urgent"

Thursday, August 8, 2019

In a commentary in the Globe and Mail, Prof. Kent Roach assesses the steps Canada needs to take in order to effectively combat far-right terrorism ("The fight against far-right terrorism is complex, arduous – and urgent," August 7, 2019).

Read the full commentary on the Globe and Mail website, or below.

Cara Locke

Cara Locke
SJD Candidate
Thesis title:
Constitutional Remedies to Guard the Justice System
Office in Falconer Hall
84 Queen's Park
Toronto, M5S 2C5

Through the lens of criminal justice, Cara is interested in how judges act like legislators, and how legislators act like judges. She researches how constitutional remedies become a last resort for fixing defective, antiquated criminal laws. 

Outside of academia, Cara has experience litigating for both the prosecution and the defence. The practice of law on the ground, and particularly at the trial level, continues to shape her research.

Education
LLM - Criminal Law
JD (Distinction)
BA (Hons) - Psychology and English
Awards and Distinctions
C. David Naylor Fellow
Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Scholar
Nathan Strauss Q.C. Graduate Fellow in Canadian Constitutional Law
Raoul Wallenberg Scholarship
Doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto Faculty of Law
LLM Fellow, University of Toronto Faculty of Law
Spracklin Award, Law Society of Newfoundland & Labrador
Penney Award, Law Society of Newfoundland & Labrador
University Medal for Academic Excellence in Psychology
Professional Affiliations
Nova Scotia Barristers' Society
Law Society of Ontario
Canadian Study of Parliament Group
Canadian Law & Society Association
Selected Publications

“Remedying the Remedy: Bedford’s Suspended Declaration of Invalidity” (2018) 41:3 Man LJ 281.

"The (Un)Desirability of Testimony from Judges to Legislators" in Canadian Study of Parliament Group, Legislatures in Evolution: Changes, Challenges, Questions [Forthcoming in 2020]

 

Research Interests
Administrative Law
Canadian Constitutional Law
Charter of Rights
Criminal Law 
Criminal Procedure and Evidence
Health Law
Judicial Decision-Making
Legal Process
Legal Theory
National Security Law and Anti-Terrorism Law
Political Philosophy and Theory
Supervisor
Committee Members

U of T Law students sharpen advocacy skills in unique criminal law externship focused on appellate and Supreme Court cases

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Providing mentorship and feedback to U of T law students: (L) Adjunct professor Michael Dineen, 3L Glen Tucker, 3L SuJung Lee, 3L Kenzie Bunting, with adjunct professors Gerald Chan, Nader Hasan and Erin Dann, and externship co-supervisor Professor Vincent Chiao.

 

By Peter Boisseau / Photography by Dhoui Chang

A unique U of T Law externship seminar course unlike anything offered by other Canadian universities is helping balance the scales of justice, as students lend their talents to some of the best criminal appeal lawyers in Canada.

Prof. Kent Roach writes "One year after the acquittal of Gerald Stanley, little has changed"

Monday, February 11, 2019

In a commentary in the Globe and Mail on the anniversary of the acquittal of Gerald Stanley for the killing of Colton Boushie, Prof. Kent Roach assesses what little has been done, and what more needs to be done, to ensure "Canadian justice does not continue to be experienced by Indigenous people as injustice." ("One year after the acquittal of Gerald Stanley, little has changed," February 9, 2019).

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