Oliver Chan

SJD Candidate
Thesis title:
Laying the Administrative Foundations for a Constitutional Right to Adequate Housing in Canada
Office in Falconer Hall
84 Queen's Park
Toronto, M5S 2C5

Oliver is a doctoral candidate at the Faculty of Law with research interests in public law, political and legal theory, and comparative legal studies. His thesis explores the interpretation and enforcement of positive rights globally as well as the moral purposes of public law and the administrative state. He argues that the constitutional rights to life and equality place obligations on the state to provide safe and affordable housing. Oliver is a graduate of the combined BCL/JD program at McGill University where he received a Lieutenant Governor's Youth Medal from the Honourable J. Michel Doyon for his high academic standing and his work towards improving access to justice in the greater Montréal community. Prior to joining the Faculty of Law, Oliver completed an LLM at Queen's University and worked as the Director of Research for a legal information clinic in Montréal.

Education
LLM, Specialization in Political and Legal Thought: Queen’s University (2023)
BCL & JD: McGill University (2022)
BA (First Class Honours) Political Science & Philosophy: McGill University (2018)
Awards and Distinctions
The Mary And Louis Anisman Fellowship In Law And Fairness (2023-2024)
Lieutenant Governor of Québec Youth Medal (2022)
Fern Gertrude Kennedy Prize in Jurisprudence (2021)
Allan Neil Assh Memorial Award in Business Associations (2021)
Michael L. Garmaise Prize in Political Science (2018)
Maldoff Family Arts Research Internship Award (2017)
Research Group on Constitutional Studies Student Fellow: Yan P. Lin Centre for the Study of Freedom and Global Orders in the Ancient and Modern Worlds (2016-2019)
Research Interests
Administrative Law
Canadian Constitutional Law
Charter of Rights
Comparative Law
Judicial Decision-Making
Legal Theory
Supervisor
Committee Members

Kate Mitchell

SJD Candidate
Thesis title:
Comparing the Levers of Prison Law Reform in Canada and the United States
Office in Falconer Hall
84 Queen's Park
Toronto, M5S 2C5
Tel:
236-334-6034
Education
Master of Laws - University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) (2021-2022)
Juris Doctor - Queen's University (2014-2017)
Master of Public Administration - Queen's University (2014-2015)
Bachelor of Arts - Dalhousie University (2011-2014)
Awards and Distinctions
Canada Graduate Scholarship - Doctoral (CGS-D) (2022-2025)
C. David Naylor University Fellowship (2022-2023)
University of Toronto Centre for Ethics Doctoral Fellow in Ethics (2022-2023)
UCLA Dean's Tuition Fellowship (2021-2022)
Torkin Manes LLP Academic Excellence & Community Service Award (2017)
Fred S. Fountain Scholarship (2011-2014)
Lockward Scholarship (2011-2014)
H.C. (Kip) Roberts Scholarship (2014)
Margaret Nicholl Pond Memorial Award (2014)
Professional Affiliations
Member, Law Society of Ontario
Member, Canadian Prison Law Association
Research Interests
Administrative Law
Canadian Constitutional Law
Charter of Rights
Comparative Law
Criminal Law 
Criminal Procedure and Evidence
Judicial Decision-Making
Supervisor
Committee Members

Dimitrios Tsilikis

SJD Candidate
Thesis title:
Justifications of Recourse Rules (working title)
Office in Falconer Hall
84 Queen's Park
Toronto, M5S 2C5

 I am a second year S.J.D. student working on Bankruptcy Law and Private Law Theory. My main project is focused on the normative foundations of personal bankruptcy law in the U.S. and Canadian legal orders. I do also research on some side-projects on corporate bankruptcy especially in the U.S., currently working on the intersection of mass tort litigation and bankruptcy.

 I started my legal career in civil law countries (Greece and France), but I have transitioned towards the common law world with my LL.M. in Legal Theory at NYU School of Law and my S.J.D. at the University of Toronto. 

I am a lawyer in Greece and I spend some time lawyering in Greek and E.U. law, especially on restructuring consultation.

In my spare time I like to read moral and political philosophy as they tend to be really helpful in providing analytical tools in legal research. Other than that, I love reading on aesthetics and the philosophy of mind.

Education
LL.B. - National and Capodistrian University of Athens - Faculty of Law
LL.B. (Erasmus+) - Paris 1 - Panthéon-Sorbonne - École de Droit
LL.M. - New York University School of Law
S.J.D. - University of Toronto - Faculty of Law
Professional Affiliations
Athens Bar Association (Greece)
Research Interests
Bankruptcy/Insolvency Law
Business Corporations
Competition Law
Judicial Decision-Making
Legal Theory
Moral Philosophy
Political Philosophy and Theory
Property Law
Tax Law
Supervisor
Committee Members

Julian Huertas

SJD Candidate
Thesis title:
Human Rights Law in Contexts of Democratic Erosion: The Approach of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights to Authoritarian Rule in Venezuela and the Response of the Nation’s Apex Court
Office in Falconer Hall
84 Queen's Park
Toronto, M5S 2C5

Julian Huertas is a doctoral candidate at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law under the supervision of Professors Karen Knop and David Dyzenhaus, and the guidance of committee members Profs. Richard Stacey and Galit A. Sarfaty.

He is interested in rethinking the unexplored possibilities offered by human rights law and politics to combat autocratic populism and enhance liberal democracy and the rule of law. His doctoral research examines the political role of human rights law and institutions in contexts of democratic erosion, as well as the challenges posed by new illiberal conceptions of international human rights law. The first part of the investigation studies how, while international human rights courts are typically focused on individuals and their concrete circumstances, they can also serve an essential function in confronting autocratic regimes. The second part focuses on understanding the nature of the contestation to human rights institutions from the viewpoint of frameworks that overcome simplistic explanations of the populist threat. In particular, it explores whether an ambiguously legal but authoritarian interpretation of human rights can seriously compete with the classical understanding of the same concept. The research engages with these questions as embodied in the confrontation between the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and the Supreme Tribunal of Justice of Venezuela. Specifically, it assesses a set of decisions delivered by the Inter-American Court against Venezuela that were rejected and contested by the Supreme Tribunal during the first two decades of this century. 

Julian has presented his work at the New Voices in International Law panel organized by the American Society of International Law (ASIL); the Global Scholars Academy held by the Harvard Law School Institute for Global Law and Policy (IGLP); Cornell Law School Inter-University Graduate Conference; the Emerging Voices panel during the International Law Weekend of the American Branch of the International Law Association (ABILA); Sciences Po’s Intensive Doctoral Week; the Symposium International Law without International Courts, organized by ASIL’s International Courts and Tribunals Interest Group; and iCourt’s Ph.D. Summer School.

He holds an LL.M. from Columbia Law School, where he was a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar; an LL.M. in International Law from Universidad de La Sabana (Colombia); and received a Law degree (equivalent to an LL.B.) from Universidad del Rosario (Colombia). He has been assistant professor of international law, now on leave, at Universidad de La Sabana. He has also been a coach of La Sabana’s teams that participate in moot courts like the Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition and the ELSA Moot Court Competition on WTO Law.

Education
S.J.D. Candidate, University of Toronto Faculty of Law (2019-present).
LL.M., Columbia University (2019).
LL.M. in International Law, Universidad de La Sabana (Colombia) (2016).
LL.B., Universidad del Rosario (Colombia) (2011).
Awards and Distinctions
Mary H. Beatty Fellowship, University of Toronto (2020).
Warren K. Winkler Graduate Fellowship in International Human Rights, University of Toronto Faculty of Law (2019).
Naomi Overend Fellowship in Human Rights, University of Toronto Faculty of Law (2019).
Houlden & Morawetz Graduate Scholarship, University of Toronto Faculty of Law (2019).
University of Toronto Fellowship (2019).
Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar, Columbia Law School (2019).
Parker School Recognition of Achievement in International and Comparative Law, Columbia Law School (2019).
Laureate Thesis Award – Summa cum laude, Universidad de La Sabana (2016).
Selected Publications

Print Publications in Journals and Law Reviews

  • Protecting Individual Rights to Counteract Democratic Backsliding: Human Rights Law as a Partial Response to Autocratic Populism116 Proceedings of the ASIL Annual Meeting 136 (2022).
  • Human Rights Promises Revisited: Kent Roach’s Exceptional Contribution to the Study of Judicial Remedies, 19 Journal of Law & Equality 30 (2022).
  • Diagnóstico Sobre las Relaciones entre el Derecho Internacional y el Derecho Interno. El Caso Colombiano (with Paola Acosta, Juana Acosta & Daniel Rivas), 16 Estudios Constitucionales (2018).
  • Caso Chaparro Álvarez vs. Ecuador. Un caso de arbitraje sui generis y delegación de jurisdicción en el SIDH (with Nicolás Córdoba), 6 Revista Iberoamericana de Derecho Internacional y de la Integración (2017).
  • Monismo moderado colombiano: examen a la teoría oficial de la Corte Constitucional desde la obra de Alfred Verdross, 132 Vniversitas (2016).

Book Chapters

  • Not so Moderate: The Relationship Between the Colombian Legal System and International Law (with Carlos Arevalo), in Alejandro Linares-Cantillo (ed.), Constitutionalism: Old Dilemmas, New Insights (Oxford University Press, 2021).

  • Integración Europea, una nueva dogmática jurídica y el salto hacia el constitucionalismo plural, in Juan Pablo Pampillo & Arturo Damián (eds.), Integraciones Jurídicas Americanas: teoría, historia, instituciones y derecho (Editorial Porrúa, 2017).

  • Teorías sobre la relación entre el derecho interno y el derecho internacional en la jurisprudencia constitucional colombiana (with Paola Acosta), in Juana Acosta, Paola Acosta, et al. (eds), De Anacronismos y Vaticinios: Diagnóstico sobre las Relaciones entre el Derecho Internacional y el Derecho Interno en Latinoamérica (Universidad Externado de Colombia, 2017).

  • De los modelos de desarrollo al derecho a la igualdad (with Juan Fernando Sánchez), in Rodríguez, Gloria & Vargas-Chaves, Iván (eds.), Políticas de igualdad e intereses colectivos: reflexiones y nuevos retos (Editorial Ibáñez, Universidad de Salamanca, 2014).

Online 

  • Sentiment as Blasphemy: On Gerry Simpson’s International Legal Garden, International Law Agendas (ILA-Brazil), July 2022 (Link here).

  • The Precarity of the People, Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought, June 2019 (Link here).
  • Assemblies, People and Democracy in 2019, Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought, June 2019 (Link here).
  • To Destitute the World, Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought, October 2018 (Link here).

 

Research Interests
Comparative Law
International Law
Judicial Decision-Making
Law and Globalization
Legal Theory
Supervisor
Committee Members

Cara Locke*

Cara Locke (*née Mouland)
SJD Candidate
Thesis title:
Remedial Justice: The Legitimacy of Constitutional Remedies for Criminal Laws
Office in Falconer Hall
84 Queen's Park
Toronto, M5S 2C5

Cara is interested in how judges act like legislators, and how legislators act like judges.

Her doctoral project focuses on constitutional remedies for criminal laws. Cara's previous work has been cited by the Supreme Court of Canada in support of a disciplined approach to suspended declarations of invalidity.

Outside of academia, Cara has front-line experience as a lawyer in both the courtroom and in the legislature. This concrete grounding continues to shape her work on the proper boundaries between judges and legislators.

Education
LLM - Criminal Law
JD (Distinction)
BA (Hons) - Psychology and English
Awards and Distinctions
C. David Naylor Fellow
Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Scholar
Nathan Strauss Q.C. Graduate Fellow in Canadian Constitutional Law
Raoul Wallenberg Scholarship
Doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto Faculty of Law
LLM Fellow, University of Toronto Faculty of Law
Professional Affiliations
Nova Scotia Barristers' Society
Commonwealth Parliamentary Association
Association of Clerks-at-the-Table in Canada
Selected Publications

"Debating the Rule of Law: The Curious Re-Enactment of the Solicitation Offence" (2021) 58: 3 Alta L Rev 687.

“Remedying the Remedy: Bedford’s Suspended Declaration of Invalidity” (2018) 41:3 Man LJ 281. (Cited in G v Ontario, 2020 SCC 38)
 *née Mouland

Research Interests
Administrative Law
Canadian Constitutional Law
Charter of Rights
Comparative Law
Criminal Law 
Criminal Procedure and Evidence
Judicial Decision-Making
Legal Process
Legal Theory
National Security Law and Anti-Terrorism Law
Political Philosophy and Theory
Supervisor
Committee Members

Prof. Kent Roach writes "One year after the acquittal of Gerald Stanley, little has changed"

Monday, February 11, 2019

In a commentary in the Globe and Mail on the anniversary of the acquittal of Gerald Stanley for the killing of Colton Boushie, Prof. Kent Roach assesses what little has been done, and what more needs to be done, to ensure "Canadian justice does not continue to be experienced by Indigenous people as injustice." ("One year after the acquittal of Gerald Stanley, little has changed," February 9, 2019).

Embrace the unexpected, says Elena Kagan, U.S. Supreme Court Justice and U of T honorary degree recipient

Friday, November 16, 2018

Justice Elena Kagan, centre, with Prof. Albert Yoon (far left), the Hon. Frank Iacobucci and Chancellor Rose Patten at the Convocation ceremony. Photo by Lisa Sakulensky.

By Romi Levine, U of T News

Elena Kagan’s career has been both varied and accomplished. The associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States has worked in the White House, taught at the University of Chicago, and is the first woman to become dean of Harvard Law School and to hold the job of U.S. solicitor general.

Indigenous Initiatives Office's Amanda Carling writes "Pleading guilty when innocent: A truth for too many Indigenous people"

Friday, May 25, 2018

In a commentary in the Globe and Mail, Amanda Carling, manager of the Indigenous Initiatives Office, highlights the issue of innocent people – a disproportionate number of them First Nations, Inuit and Métis people – pleading guilty to crimes they did not commit ("Pleading guilty when innocent: A truth for too many Indigenous people," May 23, 2018).

Read the full commentary on the Globe and Mail website, or below.

SJD student Daniel Del Gobbo co-authors article in Policy Options on modernizing the criminal justice system in the wake of #MeToo

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

SJD student and Trudeau Scholar Daniel Del Gobbo has co-authored (with Vathsala Illesinghe) a commentary in the magazine Policy Options, "The #MeToo movement has exposed inequalities in the legal system that disadvantage women. Restorative justice could help in certain sexual violence cases" (April 23, 2018).

Read the full commentary on the Policy Options website, or below.

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