Top 10 news stories of 2018

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Top 10From outstanding students and remarkable events to alumni achievements and new faculty, here are the stories that made you click in 2018.

Prof. Michael Trebilcock writes "For developing countries looking for guidance, role models are sorely lacking"

Monday, January 7, 2019

In a commentary in the Globe and Mail, Prof. Michael Trebilcock writes about the difficulty of finding relevant role models for developing countries looking to improve the quality of their institutions ("For developing countries looking for guidance, role models are sorely lacking," January 1, 2019).

Read the full commentary on the Globe and Mail website, or below.


 

Alumnus Jonathan Dawe and former faculty member Lorne Sossin receive judicial appointments

Monday, December 17, 2018

Former Faculty of Law Associate Dean Lorne Sossin and Adjunct Professor Jonathan Dawe, Class of 1994, have been appointed to the Superior Court of Justice of Ontario in Toronto, announced Dec. 13, 2018, by Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada Jody Reybould.

Dawe, a partner at Dawe & Dineen, is appointed a judge of the Superior Court of Justice of Ontario in Newmarket. Sossin, a professor at Osgoode Hall Law School and its former dean, is appointed a judge of the Superior Court of Justice of Ontario in Toronto.

Prof. Kent Roach writes "Is police independence at risk in Ontario?" in Globe and Mail

Monday, December 10, 2018

In a commentary in the Globe and Mail, Prof. Kent Roach writes about the importance of police independence in the context of the Ipperwash inquiry and of Ontario's new government ("Is police independence at risk in Ontario?", December 10, 2018).

"Police independence is a poorly understood and sometimes abused concept. But that does not mean that is not fundamental to democracy and the rule of law."

Prof. Anita Anand writes "There’s one legal way to insider trade — but maybe there shouldn’t be"

Friday, December 7, 2018

In a commentary in the Financial Post, Prof. Anita Anand analyzes Bombardier's Automatic Share Disposition Plan (ASDP), which allows executives to exercise their options and sell the resulting stock ("There’s one legal way to insider trade — but maybe there shouldn’t be," December 7, 2018).

Read the full story on the Financial Post website, or below.


 

Prof. Anita Anand writes "Canadian taxpayers shouldn’t have to pay for Bombardier’s bad corporate governance"

Thursday, December 6, 2018

In a commentary in the Financial Post, Prof. Anita Anand argues that a federal bailout of Bombardier would be unwise as long as that company maintains its dual-class share structure ("Canadian taxpayers shouldn’t have to pay for Bombardier’s bad corporate governance," December 5, 2018).

Be it resolved: The prohibition on payment for surrogacy and gametes in Canada should be repealed

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Debate chair Professor Roxanne Mykitiuk, Osgoode Hall Law School, Vida Panitch, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Carleton University and Professor Françoise Baylis of Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine

Debate discusses if current prohibition is required or justified

Story and photo by Peter Boisseau

University of Toronto Faculty of Law ranks among Top 10 public law schools in the world: Times Higher Education

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

University of Toronto one of only eight universities globally to place in Top 50 in all Tines Higher Education subject rankings

By Romi Levine

The Times Higher Education 2019 World University Rankings by Subject ranked the University of Toronto Faculty of Law among the Top 10 public law schools, according to new rankings by the prestigious Times Higher Education.

Justice Roger Hughes keynoted annual Patent Colloquium

Friday, November 30, 2018

"What is a patent? It's a ticket to sue!"

By German Andres Guberman and Amanda Wolczanski, JD students

Justice Roger Hughes gave a candid and engaging talk on the patent system, as part of the keynote for the seventh annual Patent Law Colloquium, organized by the Centre for Innovation Law and Policy. His self-proclaimed “rant” was an informal analysis of the patent system's cast of characters (including patent officers, judges and lawyers), deficiencies, and potential fixes.