Competition Policy Symposium

University of Toronto Faculty of Law
Law and Economics Program

presents

Symposium on Competition Policy in the Age of Big Data Net Neutrality and

Matthew Thomas Marinett

SJD Candidate
Thesis title:
Corporate Responsibility and Accountability in Internet Content Governance
Office in Falconer Hall
84 Queen's Park
Toronto, M5S 2C5
Tel:
416 525 2227

Matthew is a doctoral candidate in law at the University of Toronto. His broader research examines the rule of law implications of the corporate control and and governance of rights, especially with respect to copyright, privacy and freedom of expression. His doctoral project examines the manner in which internet corporations create rules and make rights-affecting decisions with worldwide impact and minimal public accountability. Specifically, it explores the applicability of standards of human rights and global administrative law to internet corporations engaged in content governance: a difficult prospect given the numerous forms content governance takes, the extant interaction between states and internet intermediaries, the human rights implications, and the transnational nature of the internet. Nonetheless, the project examines what such an inherently flexible standard might look like. 

Prior to pursuing an academic path, Matthew was most recently an associate at Gowling Lafleur Henderson (now Gowling WLG) in the Intellectual Property department. He worked primarily within the Entertainment Law Group and the Advertising, Marketing and Regulatory Affairs Group. Prior to joining Gowlings, he volunteered his time at Advocates for Injured Workers, a legal clinic which assisted low-income clients who had been injured in the course of their employment obtain workers' compensation benefits.

 

Education
SJD Candidate - Present
LLM - 2016 - University of Toronto Faculty of Law
JD - 2012 - University of Toronto Faculty of Law
Honours BSc Planetary Science - 2008 - University of Western Ontario
Awards and Distinctions
CIGI International Law Research Program SJD Scholarship (2019-2021)
Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Doctoral Scholarship (2018-2021)
Doctoral Fellowship in Innovation Law and Policy (2016-2018)
University of Toronto Doctoral Fellowship (2016-2018)
Masters Fellowship in Innovation Law and Policy (2015-2016)
Gerald Flaherty Prize in Entertainment Law (2010)
Western Scholarship of Excellence
Professional Affiliations
Law Society of Upper Canada
Canadian Bar Association
Selected Publications

Matthew Marinett, “The Race to the Bottom: Comity and Cooperation in Global Internet Takedown Orders” [forthcoming, UBC Law Review].

Matthew Marinett, “Protecting Individual Self-Interest in Aggregate as the Basis of Fairness in Contract” (2018) 55:3 Alberta Law Review 703.

Matthew Marinett, “The Alienation of Economic Rights and the Case for Stickier Copyright” (2017) 30:1 Intellectual Property Journal 125.

Matthew Marinett, “Copyright and innovation” (5 July 2017) Policy Options.

Brenda Pritchard & Matthew Marinett, “Political Advertising and Freedom of Expression” in Brenda Pritchard & Susan Vogt, eds, Advertising and Marketing Law in Canada, 5th ed (Markham: LexisNexis Canada, 2015).

Research Interests
Charter of Rights
Competition Law
Contracts
Economic Analysis of Law
Intellectual Property Law
Judicial Decision-Making
Legal Theory
Political Philosophy and Theory
Privacy Law
Property Law
Supervisor
Committee Members

One Million Dollar Fine Confirms the Shift of Corporate Criminal Liability From the Boardroom to Middle Managers

On April 17, 2015, Justice Tôth of the Quebec Superior Court imposed a one million dollar fine on a corporation found guilty of price fixing in the case of R. c. Pétroles Global inc ("Global Fuels"). This case is important because it affirms that corporations will be penalized for the actions of middle level territory managers, even where there is no evidence that the head office of the company was aware of the misconduct.

 

Competition Law Workshop: William Kovacic

COMPETITION LAW WORKSHOP
presents

William Kovacic
Global Competition Professor of Law and Policy; Professor of Law;
Director, Competition Law Center
George Washington University Law School 

Good Process in Competition Policy Systems:
Quality Control, Legitimacy, and Effectiveness

Monday, May 11, 2015
4:00 – 5:45
Solarium (room FA2) – Falconer Hall

Attack Ads, Copyright, and Collusion: Have Canada's Major Broadcasters Violated the Competition Act?

Canada's first (and the world's first) competition act: the Combines Act of 1889
Originally posted on Prof. Katz's blog

Last week reports emerged that the Government is considering a new copyright exception for political advertising. The reports suggested that the exception would permit the use of news content by political parties without authorization. While most of the media coverage of this story focused on the copyright issue and the phenomenon of attack ads, documents that Sun Media obtained from the CBC (under an Access to Information request) reveal an even more interesting and more important story, both politically and legally. These documents, offering a rare glimpse behind the scenes of Canada's major media organization, reveal a picture of a concerted action between the majority of Canada's news outlets, action that might run afoul the Competition Act. 

Getting into UofT Law - JD Admissions

JD Admissions visits UofT Department of Criminology

JD AdmissionsGet the inside scoop on applying to our JD program directly from the Faculty of Law Admissions Office and hear from current law students. 

Learn about our whole-person admission process and how to improve your application to our JD program. 

Innovation Law & Policy Workshop: Maria Lilla' Montagnani

INNOVATION LAW & POLICY WORKSHOP

presents

Maria Lilla' Montagnani

Bocconi University Department of Law

Presentation Title: TBA

 

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

12:30 - 2pm

Solarium (Room FA2), Falconer Hall

84 Queen's Park

Rocky start for post-Access Copyright era? Not quite

First published on Prof. Katz's blog on January 21, 2013

rocky mountainsThe Varsity last Monday published a story with the headline "Post-Access Copyright era off to a rocky start", and the sub-headline "Professors confused, frustrated by new copyright rules". Great headlines, for sure, but in reality, that's probably an exaggeration. My impression, which I have confirmed with colleagues in the UofT library system and the Faculty Association, is that so far the transition to the post-Access Copyright era has actually been even smoother than expected.

According to the Varsity,

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