Prof. Anver Emon awarded a Canada Research Chair in Religion, Pluralism and Rule of Law

Friday, October 17, 2014

The Faculty of Law’s Prof. Anver Emon has received a Canada Research Chair in Religion, Pluralism and the Rule of Law, one of 137 new and renewed CRCs announced today to recognize cutting-edge scholarship at 34 Canadian institutions.

Nine graduate students land Centre for International Governance Innovation awards

Friday, October 10, 2014

The Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) awards graduate scholarships to outstanding PhD, SJD and LLM students who are conducting research related to the think tank’s International Law Research Program. 

The one-year graduate scholarships in international law are valued at CDN $24,000 for PhD and SJD students and CDN $16,000 for LLM students.

Support our access to justice programs through the United Way

Thursday, October 9, 2014

By Sean Ingram

For low-income individuals, the stress of facing legal problems can be unbearable. The Faculty of Law is home to two outstanding programs that help to address this issue: Pro Bono Students Canada (PBSC) and Downtown Legal Services (DLS). With the help of our law students, each program works to address the access to justice issue, but like all publicly funded institutions, both programs are constantly facing financial pressures.

Under the “Umbrella”: Hong Kong protests, from student to student

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

A new 'extracurricular' for Hong Kong students: (left) Yuki Shek, Kathy Tse, Josephine Lam, Kelvin Lai and Kary Choi

 

Story and Photos By David Kumagai, 3L

Four teenage girls sit in the middle of a major Hong Kong highway. Wearing yellow ribbons and yellow headbands, they bury themselves in textbooks as crowds line the barricaded roads.  

This little band of protesters, aged 16 and 17, has joined thousands of others to occupy Hong Kong’s financial district, clog the city’s main arteries, and defy Beijing.

2014 Grand Moot wows the panel of justices

Monday, October 6, 2014

Students tackle issues of data tracking and privacy

By Lucianna Ciccocioppo

It was standing-room only in Alumni Hall on October 2, for the 2014 Grand Moot, sponsored by long-time firm partner, McCarthy Tétrault. More than 140 people attended, or watched on the video feed in an overflow room, to hear the best-of-the-best student mooters at the Faculty of Law argue issues about tracking data, privacy and the Charter.

Graduate students successful once again in latest grant applications

Friday, October 3, 2014

The Faculty of Law congratulates the following SJD and LLM students on their successful grant applications this year:

Prof. Kent Roach, with Carmen Cheung - "UN wants to battle Islamic State, but is it fighting freedom?"

Thursday, October 2, 2014

In a commentary in The Globe and Mail, Prof. Kent Roach and Carmen Cheung, former acting Director of the International Human Rights Program, analyze the dangers inherent in the United Nations Security Council's recent anti-terrorism resolution ("UN wants to battle Islamic State, but is it fighting freedom?," October 2, 2014).

Read the commentary on The Globe and Mail website, or below.


 

Article in student-run 'Law Review' cited in Quebec Superior Court

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

An article written by alumnus Eric Monkman, JD/MA 2013, in the last issue of the Law Review was recently cited by the Quebec Superior Court.

A New Approach to the Consideration of Collateral Consequences in Criminal Sentencing, (2014) 72 U.T. Fac. L. Rev. 38) was published in Vol. 72:2. Alumna Adrienne Ho, JD 2014, and 3L Ljiljana Stanić were the editors-in-chief. Prof. Simon Stern was the faculty advisor.

Profs. Trebilcock and Iacobucci examine CRTC’s mandatory pick-and-pay proposal

Friday, September 26, 2014

Profs. Michael Trebilcock and Edward Iacobucci, with lawyer Lawson Hunter, have written a commentary in the Financial Post arguing against the CRTC's proposal to require TV providers to provide "pick and pay" channel selection options for consumers ("CRTC’s mandatory pick-and-pay proposal deeply misguided," September 25, 2014). The article is based on a report prepared by the authors for the C.D.

Food security about entitlement, not availability, says scholar Anne Orford, Katherine Baker Memorial lecturer

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
portrait of Melcourne Law School professor Anne Orford

By Peter Boisseau

The wave of protests called the “Arab Spring” were as much about bread as freedom, says Melbourne Law School Professor Anne Orford, and brought into sharp focus a “dark side” of free trade principles lawyers helped create two centuries ago and now could help solve.