Instructor(s): Yasmin Dawood

For graduate students, the course number is LAW5024H.

Note: This course is eligible for either the Perspective or International/Comparative/Transnational course requirement.

Note: The Quercus program will be used for this course. Students must self-enrol in Quercus as soon as confirmed in the course in order to obtain course information.

This seminar examines the connections between democracy and the law. In what way does the law shape democracy? How should courts adjudicate disputes over the ground rules of democracy? Does the law help to sustain democratic politics, or does it undermine democracy? What role does the law play in the decline of democracy around the world?

The seminar covers various topics in the comparative law of democracy, such as money in politics, partisan gerrymandering, and the denial of voting rights. It also addresses contemporary worries about the decline of constitutional democracy by drawing on the experiences of various countries and by considering such topics as the effect of the Trump presidency on democracy, social media and democracy, and the rise in populism and authoritarianism. The readings are interdisciplinary and include materials from constitutional law and theory, democratic theory, and political science.

Evaluation
The course evaluation consists of: (1) a 5,500-6,000 word paper (80%); (2) class participation (10%); and (3) two short comments (750 words each) on the readings assigned for class (each worth 5%, graded on a credit/no credit basis).

At a Glance

First Term
Credits
3
Hours
2
Perspective course
ICT

Enrolment

Maximum
25
20 JD
5 LLM/SJD/MSL/NDEGS/SJD U

Schedule

M: 10:30 - 12:20