Instructor(s): Anthony Niblett

For graduate students, the course number is LAW2014HS.

This course will explore the economic theories that underpin various aspects of competition policy. The course will focus on Canadian competition policy, but the policies of the United States and the EU will also be examined. The course will review the economic theory in order to provide a framework for evaluating the legal treatment of various practices. Topics include: the economic and non-economic goals of competition policy; collusion, price fixing and facilitating practices; horizontal mergers; monopoly and monopolization; price discrimination and predatory pricing; and vertical restraints, including resale price maintenance, exclusive dealing, tying, territorial restrictions and requirements contracting. This course will be taught at the law school and is open both to law students and to honours and graduate students in economics. It will be helpful for students to have some basic grounding in microeconomics.

Evaluation
There are 4 components to the course evaluation. Students will be required to write a final, 1 hour open book in-class test (30%); write a 2,000 word essay due at the end of the semester (30%); and write 6 short responses (250-500 words) answering questions about the reading (30%). There is also a 10% participation grade, based on student input into class discussions.

At a Glance

Second Term
Credits
3
Hours
3

Enrolment

Maximum
40
33 JD
5 LLM/SJD/MSL/NDEGS/SJD U
2 graduate students in Economics

Schedule

M: 4:10 - 7:00